10 Harsh Realities Of Watching Full House Today, 36 Years Later.
2024/02/10

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Several aspects of Full House are challenging to digest today, nearly 40 years after its debut. The popular ABC family sitcom aired from the late '80s until 1994.  House resonated with audiences due to its realistic depiction of the highs and lows of parenting from both the perspectives of the parents and the children.

It eventually achieved cult status and even spawned a spin-off series called Fuller House, which was approved by Netflix. One of the groundbreaking aspects of Full House was its non-traditional family dynamic. Instead of a traditional mother figure, three men - Danny, Jesse, and Joey - raised three young girls named DJ, Stephanie, and Michelle.

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Fuller House improved on this aspect, although it still fell short. The treatment of Kimmy Gibbler, DJ's best friend and neighbor, is also problematic. While her kooky personality provided comedic moments, her interactions with the Tanner household were often challenging to watch.

The show never delved deeper into exploring Danny's behavior, choosing instead to make it a running joke. The use of a laugh track in Full House is another aspect that can be distracting for modern viewers. Although the show was filmed in front of a live studio audience, a laugh track was consistently present.

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One memorable line from the show, in which Becky claimed she was a law-abiding citizen, takes on a new context following Lori Loughlin's involvement in the National College Admission Scandal. This incident led to Loughlin's imprisonment and her subsequent dismissal from Fuller House.

Recognizing these flaws allows viewers to critically engage with the show's legacy and appreciate its positive contributions while acknowledging its limitations.

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